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Downloading Music Is Forgettable, Buying It Wasn’t

image from upload.wikimedia.org For most of my life, buying music included a pilgrimage. The closest place that sold CDs took an hour drive to get there. I still have a few memories of the trips I would undertake on Tuesdays just to get my hands on a new album. While I never got to experience the thrill of waiting outside of a record store, hours before it opened, with hundreds of other fans clamoring to hear an album for the first time. The release of new music still represented an event to me; something to be looked forward to.

In the early days of file-sharing, downloading songs still had a process. You had to search out the album information, plug it into the engine, and comb through until you found the correct files. Then, you waited. It could take hours. Playing the songs for the first time constituted as an event too. There was still built up anticipation and the sublime feeling of hearing a song for the very first time.

That's all gone now. Even file-sharing music isn't an event anymore.

BitTorrent downloads music so fast that there isn't any waiting. If a fan dreams something up, they can have in the matter of minutes. Then, they play the whole album. Likely, they'll just play a couple of songs. After that, they may not listen to the album ever again; it will just sit in a folder. If they don't like what they hear, they'll probably delete the album instantly, never giving it another chance. When is the last time that you and three of your friends stayed up late, eyes pursed on the computer screen, in the hopes of being the first ones download an album?

It doesn't happen. Those friends streamed the songs on YouTube or downloaded it off BitTorrent a month before it came out. In most cases, they know what the music sounds like. They'll get around to buying it. But you can't hug an MP3.

"No one will ever fondly recall the night they downloaded a new album. The ritual of standing in line at midnight to obtain a physical copy of a piece of music is now over. Thanks to MP3 format, ritual, nostalgia, traditional physical music spaces, physical forms and aesthetic value are
all aspects of music culture that are dead or dying
." (Read on.)

 

For most of my life, buying music included a pilgrimage. The closest place that sold CDs took an hour drive to get there. I still have a few memories of the trips I would undertake on Tuesdays just to get my hands on a new album. While I never got to experience the thrill of waiting outside of a record store, hours before it opened, with hundreds of other fans clamoring to hear an album for the first time. The release of new music still represented an event to me—something to be looked forward to. In the early days of file-sharing, downloading songs still had a process. You had to search out the album information, plug it into the engine, and comb through until you found the correct files. Then, you had to wait. It could take hours. Playing the songs for the first time constituted as an event too. There was still built up anticipation and the sublime feeling of hearing a song for the first time. That's all gone now. Even file-sharing isn't an event anymore. BitTorrent downloads music so fast that there isn't any waiting. If a fan dreams something up, they can have in the matter of minutes. Then, they play the whole album. Likely, they'll just play a couple of songs. After that, they may not listen to the album ever again; it will just sit in a folder. If they don't like what they hear, they'll probably delete the album instantly, never giving it another chance.

When is the last time that you and three of your friends stayed up late, eyes pursed on the computer screen, in the hopes of being the first ones to be in line to download an album off iTunes? It doesn't happen. Those friends streamed the songs on YouTube or downloaded it off BitTorrent a month before it came out. In most cases, they already know what the music sounds like. They'll get around to buying it eventually. But you can't hug an MP3.

"Consumers have watched as the canvas for album art has shrunk from LP size to the possible option of no art at all. Record stores, even chains, were closed or forced back into the subculture, changing the experiences of buying and finding out about new music to cold, calculated processes that involve zero social interaction. Music has now been unofficially relegated as "background" to other activities. It is no longer the centerpiece of entertainment. It is merely a soundtrack to activities such as jogging and walking to one's car. Most likely, no one will ever fondly recall the night they downloaded a new album. The ritual of standing in line at midnight to obtain a physical copy of a piece of music is now over. Thanks to MP3 technology, ritual, nostalgia, traditional physical music spaces, physical forms and aesthetic value are all aspects of music culture that are dead or dying."


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